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1930s - Edwin and Marguerite Haid - Bell-Holden Farm neighbours

haid-edwin-joseph-and-marguerite-honora-schmouse-wedding.jpg 1923 - Holden (Bell) Farmhouse - c1920Thumbnails1944 - Cottage 6-7 -  Mrs. Irene Margaret (W.H.) Martin1923 - Holden (Bell) Farmhouse - c1920Thumbnails1944 - Cottage 6-7 -  Mrs. Irene Margaret (W.H.) Martin1923 - Holden (Bell) Farmhouse - c1920Thumbnails1944 - Cottage 6-7 -  Mrs. Irene Margaret (W.H.) Martin1923 - Holden (Bell) Farmhouse - c1920Thumbnails1944 - Cottage 6-7 -  Mrs. Irene Margaret (W.H.) Martin1923 - Holden (Bell) Farmhouse - c1920Thumbnails1944 - Cottage 6-7 -  Mrs. Irene Margaret (W.H.) Martin

The Haid family lived on a farm located just south of the Bell Farm headquarters from 1935 until 1949. - Edwin and Marguerite Haid lived on a farm located on a half section just south of the Bell Farm headquarters from 1935 until 1949. Their family included: Edith (1917-1955), Lloyd (1919-2001), Norman (1923-1992), Marjorie (1929-), Fred (1932-) and Edwin Jr. (1941-).

Edwin Joseph Haid (1896-1967) was originally from Hawksville, Ontario and Marguerite Honora Schmous (1899-1981), came from Wellesley Township, Ontario.

During the early 1920s, they farmed east of Briercrest, and their family continued to operate that farm until 2010.

In 1935 the Haids bought a second farm, this one located just north of Indian Head, on land once farmed by Major Bell. (The E.J. Boooks family lived in the Bell Farmhouse at that time.) The Haid's farm came with three granaries which stood in a row, one being used as a chop bin with a chopper; the other two held grain. There was a Texaco Service Station located at what was called “The Haids’ corner” -- which was later moved to a new location in town, on Grand Avenue. The Haids had built a larger granary near the Texaco Station. When Texaco moved away, they offered to the Haids a building where they had kept the soft drinks. The Haids pulled it with the tractor over near that larger granary. Fred Haid called the Texaco building the “Coca Cola” building.

SOURCES:

Haid family correspondence - 2017


Research by: Jahzi Van Iderstine and Fred Haid, and Frank Korvemaker, Regina, Sask.